Our mission is to provide leadership, information, and education leading to the enhancement of health and quality of life through the suppression of mosquitoes and other vector-transmitted diseases, and the reduction of annoyance levels caused by mosquitoes and other vectors and pests of public health importance.
The American Mosquito Control Association, founded in 1935, is a scientific/educational, not-for-profit public  service association operating under the corporation laws of the state of New Jersey. It is world-wide in scope, with members or subscribers to its publications in over 50 countries. The majority of its members are in the United States. Under its bylaws, only individuals can be "regular" members, and much of its activity is performed by volunteers, approximately 150 of these serving on Committees. It is an "open" AMCA Logoassociation and anyone may join. The Board of Directors is composed of five officers, nine regional directors and an industry director, all elected by the membership.
AMCA is not governmental nor is it subject to political control, but its services are provided mainly to public agencies and their principal staff members engaged in mosquito control, mosquito research and related activities. However, services are equally available to any agency, company or individual that may request any information or services that AMCA can provide. Also, such organizations are invited to name individuals who may apply for full "regular" membership.

There are various special memberships. Corporations, agencies and individuals desiring to participate in the work of this association are urged to become Sustaining Members. Also, U.S. income tax-deductible contributions are invited in any amount to the AMCA Foundation. Special contributions may be made in the memory of John N. Belkin, and Dan F. Boyd, or to the Student Competition or the Grassroots Fund.

Grants or services may be accepted by AMCA in accordance with its primary purposes. The AMCA is primarily an information gathering and exchange organization, and a major function is the publication of the Journal of the AMCA, and various special publications, including the AMCA Newsletter and WingBeats.

One annual meeting is held each year in a different part of the country. At these meetings, which are attended by leading mosquito workers from North America and from other countries, a great many papers are presented reporting outstanding research and operational control progress.

The AMCA recognizes individuals who have made exemplary contributions to the science of medical entomology, mosquito studies and public health; and to the development and implementation of control methods and/or equipment. Since 1937, the AMCA has awarded various types of recognition: honorary memberships, Medal of Honor, and meritorious service awards.